Getting new eyewear is so exciting for many reasons!  Who can’t wait to show off that new look, see better and enjoy the many things we may have missed due to poor sight.  Sometimes when we pick up that new eyewear and our vision is not what we are expecting, it can be frustrating and disappointing.  Here are some tips to ease the adjustment to new eyewear.

  1. New prescriptions often take a few days to adjust, but trying them in the morning when your mind is fresh is the best time.
  2. If you are trying a new type of lens such as a progressive, your adaption time can take several weeks or months, but you should notice improvements daily.  If you feel things are not improving after 3 to 4 days you may want to have your optician evaluate them.
  3. Some patients are sensitive to changes in base curves, lens materials, lens designs, vertex, face form and tilt of their new eyewear.  If you have had these adjustment issues in the past, it is good to let your optician be aware of that.
  4. In some cases your vision might be hampered by some underlying vision conditions and should be addressed by your doctor.  Cataracts, diabetes and MGD (dry eye) are the most common eye conditions that can cause vision to fluctuate or be out of focus.
  5. If everything else has been exhausted,  you can have the doctor re evaluate the prescription to see if  you need an enhancement.  It is important to note there are many variables that can cause minor differences in prescriptions day to day such as blood pressure, blood sugar and dry eye just to name a few.

Taking the time to troubleshoot your adaption to new eyewear is part of your eyewear purchase, so you should have the optician responsible for the sale of  your new glasses take the time to make the adjustments.  If you decide to go back to the prescribing office for help with eyewear purchased elsewhere, it should be expected that there may be a fee involved.  If you are still unable to get the satisfaction you want with your new eyewear, your last resort may be to file a complaint with the state ophthalmic dispensing board.